G-d visits Avraham as he recovers from his circumcision on a hot day. Suddenly Avraham notices three men, rises to greet them, and begs them to stop so that he may provide for his guests (18:3-5). When the men agree, Avraham enlists the help of his entire family. How could Avraham seemingly interrupt G-d’s visit to care for three strangers? Even if we justify his actions, how could he possibly know that such actions were acceptable?

Rabbi Nosson Tzvi Finkel reveals that every act of Avraham’s generosity was a positive reflection of his deep understanding and emulation of G-d’s chesed (kindness). This acute awareness of G-d’s infinite benevolence fueled Avraham’s endless pursuit of kindness as well as his confidence that G-d would forgive the interruption in the case that an opportunity to show compassion presented itself. Avraham’s unshakeable, uncompromising dedication to being kind should inspire us to prioritize kindness to others over all else.