From Chabad.org: The Torah now discusses the Todah (Thanksgiving) Offering, brought by an individual who survived a perilous circumstance. We then learn about various grounds for the invalidation of a sacrifice, such as impurity or improper thoughts on the part of the priest performing the service. We are then commanded not to consume blood or any of the fats offered on the altar. The prohibition against eating these fats applies to all domesticated animals. The section wraps up with the portions of meat the priest is given from the Peace Offering. With this we conclude the laws of sacrifices.

Two items stand out while reviewing this Aliya. First, the rule that any leftovers from an offering left for three days should be burnt, and if eaten it disqualifies the offering itself. This apparently indicates a certain lack of urgency by the Cohen, but I’m not sure why urgency is required of leftovers, and why it would disqualify actions done three days prior.

The second most interesting item (to me) is the prohibition of eating blood or fats leftover from an offering. I understand blood more than fats, but both seem like they carry a deeper meaning. Maybe in next cylce’s blog we’ll be able to dive deeper.