This section discusses the priestly meal offering, brought by the Cohen Gadol (high priest) twice daily, and by every priest on the day he is first inducted into Temple service. The laws of the Sin Offering and Guilt Offering, also discussed in last week’s reading, are also repeated with added details. An important principle discussed is a vessel’s absorption of sacrificial meats cooked therein, and the possibility of purging (certain types of) vessels of the vestiges it absorbed — a concept which is very germane in the laws of kosher. This section concludes with a discussion regarding various gratuities the priests were entitled to take from the different offerings and sacrifices.

An interesting distiction should be noted between the offerings brought by every Cohen on their first day, and the sin offerings brough. While the Cohen’s offering is completely burnt on the alter (priests may not keep any section to eat), the sin offering does have certain parts that are edible by the Cohen. Initial intuition would dictate that sin offerings aren’t as “edible” as first-day-Cohen offerings because the former represents sin, while the latter represents a more positive event.But perhaps the rule helps us and the Cohanim embrace the power of the offering, and getting used to the fact that it purifies, both the person who brought it, and the offering itself.